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My 5-year-old son’s ideal year would be one week long, comprising Easter, his birthday, Halloween and Christmas Day. And repeat. No sooner has he reached the bottom of his Santa sack, he’s asking me when it’s time for Easter eggs. By Easter Monday, he’s fixating on the guest list for his birthday party … and his birthday’s not until August.

Christmas, Easter, birthdays and Halloween demand a fair amount of time and attention in any family with small children. However, that’s even more true in food allergy families, who have the added organisational challenge of tracking down free from versions of cakes, chocolates and treats.

So, now Halloween’s out of the way, it’s time for me to embark on the annual search for nut free Christmas food. Here’s a list of the nut free Christmas goodies I have spied so far this year. Thanks everyone, for all the recommendations already posted on the Nutmums Facebook page – top of my Christmas list are the Wilkinsons chocolate coins spotted by Cheryl (see below). I’ll keep adding to this page as I hear of any more nut free Christmas treats.

As ever, please check the labels for yourself each time and contact the manufacturer if you are in any doubt whether something is safe.

Nut free advent calendars

  • D and D

The D&D website states that “all our products are produced in a totally nut free, dairy free and gluten free unit”. They sell both advent calendars and advent chocolates.

  • Kinnerton

Kinnerton, the king of nut free character confectionery, promise that all of their ” yummy creations … go nowhere near a nut at any time in our factory”.  This year they have advent calendars in Peppa Pig, Avengers, Inside Out, Doc McStuffins, Frozen, Hello Kitty, Me To You bear, Star Wars, Thomas, Superman and Batman, and The Simpsons.

I grabbed Star Wars and Frozen calendars when I spotted them in Matalan recently. The kiddos should be happy with this … unless they see these light up versions, which Kinnerton have introduced this year:

Kinnerton nut free light up advent calendars

(Image courtesy of Kinnerton.com)

  • Nut Free Chocolate People

Last year, I splashed out on a wooden advent calendar. I will be filling it again with advent chocolates from Nut Free Chocolate People. (If you are tempted to do the same, do check their cut off date for advent orders!)

  • Plamil

All Plamil products are “dairy free and gluten free, and produced in [their] own ‘no nuts’ factory”. Dairy free advent calendars available to order from their website.

Nut free chocolate coins

  • John Lewis

From the John Lewis website, the chocolate coins from Albert Premier Chocolaterie look nut safe. In previous years, John Lewis have also sold nut free coins from the Chocolate Alchemist, which were nut free. I’ll report back if I spy these in store!

  • Chocolates for Chocoholics

Their website states:

“RECIPE: NO NUTS          FACTORY: NO NUTS

HOWEVER THERE IS AN INFINITESIMAL (TEENY WEENY) CHANCE OF CROSS CONTAMINATION”

If that doesn’t put you off, they have bags of coins, a teddy bauble and a tree and wreath cracker.

  • Nut Free Chocolate People 

NFCP have bags of 6 chocolate coins, which can be hung as a Christmas tree decoration.

  • Wilkinsons

I have it on good authority that Wilkinsons chocolate coins are nut-safe (50p a bag, 3 varieties) – see photo below. Thank you so much Cheryl for this top tip and photo – I’m part of the stampede for this one!

Wilkinsons nut free chocolate coins

Nut free selection boxes & boxed chocolates

  • Kinnerton

Kinnerton also do selection boxes for some of their character lines. Their website states that they are stocked in Tesco, Sainsburys, Asda, Morrisons, Mothercare and Wilkinson. I tend to find their goodies in local garden centres and discount stores – this year, I bought their Star Wars and Frozen 9 piece selection boxes from my local Poundland. If you can’t find them offline, Amazon are also worth a try.

  • Nut Free Chocolate People

NFCP sell boxes of 12 or 24 nut free chocolates.

Nut Free Chocolate People christmas chocolates

(Image courtesy of Nutfreechocolatepeople.com)

Nut free tree decorations

  • D and D

D&D sell dairy free Christmas tree decorations in packs of six.

  • Nut Free Chocolate People

Nut Free Chocolate People sell chocolate filled baubles and foil wrapped chocolate coins.

  • Tasha’s Dairy Free Delights

Tasha’s Dairy Free Delights has a range of handmade Christmas chocolates. Tasha’s use Plamil, and will soon be using Plamil’s “Lots of this, None of that” chocolate (which they explain is also soya free). I understand that you can specify your choice of chocolate, when you place your order. Check out their Christmas tree decorations here.

Other nut free Christmas chocolates and sweets

  • Cadbury

The Cadbury website now allows you to filter by both “peanut-absent” and “nut-absent”.  The Christmas products aren’t showing at the time of writing … but one to keep an eye on.

Cadbury Snowbites are now available on Ocado – nut safe according to the product description.

  • Choices by Celtic Chocolates

Celtic Chocolates do not use nuts in their factory and none of their ingredients contain nuts. Their dairy free chocolate santa and white chocolate santa are available online from Free From For Kids.

  • Cocoa Libre

Cocoa Libre make dairy free chocolates which are “also wheat, gluten and nut free and suitable for coeliacs and vegans”. Louise, founder of Cocoa Libre, recently posted on the nut free chocolate page that:

“My husband is allergic to peanuts! I have had all my products lab tested to make sure they are completely free of traces so you can enjoy in confidence!”.

They now have rice milk chocolate penguins and dark mint chocolate penguins in stock.

Cocoa Libre nut free chocolate penguins

(Image courtesy of Cocoalibre.co.uk)

  • D and D

D&D Chocolates have a range of Christmas products, in chocolate or carob, that are nut-, dairy- and gluten free.

  • Kinder

From their Ocado product descriptions Kinder Mini Mix, Kinder Santa and Kinder Christmas bars all appear safe.

  • Kinnerton

Check out the Kinnerton website to search for products by character. Amazon also have Kinnerton chocolate satsumas. Oh, and, if you are after a white chocolate Olaf, Asda is worth a look (thanks Gemma!).

Asda Kinnerton white chocolate Olaf

(Image courtesy of Asda.com)

  • Malteser

Again, Maltesers MerryTeaser Reindeer , Christmas Tube and Gift Box are all looking good from their Ocado product descriptions.

  • Nestle

The Nestle Nut Avoidance List (October 2015) includes:

  • After Eight Bitesize Dark Chocolate Mints. (NOTE: After Eight wafer thin mints have recently changed to be “may contain nuts and peanuts”, as Nestle have changed the production site (thanks Angela, for this information). I’m not sure if the bitesize version are still safe – so please do check the packet, or with Nestle, if you are thinking of buying. For anyone who would like to see After Eights safe once more, check out Angela’s petition).
  • Various Matchmakers products.

Nestle also make giant tube versions of, for example, smarties,  milkybar buttons, jelly tots, fruit pastilles etc. I’ve also spotted an Aero white festive block on Ocado.

  • Nut Free Chocolate People

Check out their Christmas chocolates page, for details of their boxed chocolates, Christmas chocolates and snowman chocolates. They also sell chocolate bars which can be personalised with Happy Christmas messages.

Nut Free Chocolate People personalised Christmas barsw

(Image courtesy of Nutfreechocolatepeople.com)

  • Plamil

Plamil products are made in their “own factory which never uses dairy, gluten or nuts”. They have chocolate snowmen – available in trays of three.

  • Special Edition Chocolate

Special Edition Chocolate have some fantastic looking Christmas products, described as “Suitable for gluten free, vegetarian and nut free diets”.

Special Edition Chocolate nut free snowman

(Image courtesy of Specialeditionchocolate.co.uk)

  • Tasha’s Dairy Free Delights

Tasha’s (see above) has a large range of Christmas chocolate, including Christmas shapes, filled candy canes and lollies.

  • Waitrose / Ocado

Waitrose have brought out a Woodland Friends Chocolate Net of Robins.

Nut free Christmas biscuits

  • Cadbury

As mentioned above, the Christmas products haven’t yet been added to the Cadbury website. One to watch.

  • Campervan Cookies

A big thank you to Lisa for this recommendation! The allergy advice on their website states:

“Our cookies contain gluten, milk, wheat and egg and are suitable for vegetarians. All our products are carefully made in our own cookie workshop, which is a nut-free environment.”

Check out their selection of Christmas cookies.

Campervan cookies

(Image courtesy of Campervancookies.com)

  • Sainsburys

Cadbury Festive Friends are back for 2015 and safe according to the Sainsburys product description.

I’ll also be buying the Sainsbury’s Family Biscuit Selection again this year.

  • United Biscuits

The McVitie’s Family Circle Biscuit Selection also look nut safe.

Nut free gingerbread

  • Sainsbury’s

Sainsbury’s have a Bake Your Own Gingerbread House, which looks good from the website description.

  • Waitrose

Waitrose have a nut safe Gingerbread Activity Kit and Ocado stock Lovemore Free From Gingerbread Men (packs of 6).

Nut free mince pies & mincemeat

I have yet to find a box of ready-made mince pies which aren’t labelled “may contain nuts”. If anyone finds a safe box, please do post a comment below!

I’m resigned to making my own – cheating with JusRol pastry and one of the following fillings (all of which have no nuts in the ingredients and no may contain warning):

Nut free Christmas dinner: gravy, stuffing and sauces

  • Free & Easy

I like Free & Easy’s caramelised red onion gravy (free from wheat, gluten, dairy, nuts and more). They also do a gravy sauce mix.

  • Friendly Food and Drink Company

The Friendly Food and Drink Company make preserves, jams and relishes that are free from gluten, glucose, nuts and (with the exception of their curds) dairy. Their Christmas range includes Christmas Chutney, Cumberland Christmas Sauce and Christmas Jam.
Friendly Food and Drink Christmas chutney

(Image courtesy of Friendlyfoodanddrink.co.uk)

  • Paxo

Paxo Celebration sausage meat and thyme stuffing mix has no nuts in the ingredients (only “may contain” is milk).

Nut free Christmas puddings

There are a few nut free Christmas puddings available in the supermarkets (most I’ve seen are alcohol free too, though…)

Nut free festive cakes

  • Just Love Food Company

Just Love Food Company produce nut safe celebration cakes, available to buy from UK supermarkets. They also produce a Christmas range, available to order via email Karen@justlovefoodcompany.com or via their Facebook page.

Just Love Food Company Christmas cupcakes

(Image courtesy of Just Love Food Company)

  • Heavenly Cake Company

The Heavenly Cake Company lets customers build their own free from cake, to which you can add a personal message or, for example, top with their Christmas topper.

Are there any more?

As ever, if I’ve missed any, please do post a comment below. And if you are searching for a nut free version of a specific product, without luck, do post a question on the Nutmums Facebook page – someone might be able to help.

Happy Christmas everyone, when we get there!

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How do you draw the line between safe and risky food for your nut allergic child? I’ve been giving a lot of thought to this of late, when compiling the Nutmums.com nut free food directory.

What do I actually mean by the phrase “nut free food”?

When grocery shopping I would consider the following types of foods as safe for D:

  • Fresh fruit and vegetables (even if loose on display, as they would be washed before eating).
  • Fresh meat (either pre-packed and with no nut warning on the label, or from a butchers or farm shop who has confirmed the meat hasn’t been in proximity to nuts).
  • Dedicated “nut free brands”, namely those who proudly state their product is “nut free” or “nut safe” on the label.
  • Other pre-packed foods which contain no mention of nuts in the ingredients and have no “may contain nuts” or equivalently worded warning.

Then I read that “nut free” claims are largely unregulated (see below).

Then there’s the problem of deciphering a food manufacturer’s allergen controls. We avoid foods with nut warning labels. However, given “may contain” labelling is voluntary, if there is NO label, how do I know if a product is safe? I contact the manufacturer: but what questions should I ask? Does it need to be made in a nut free factory? If the factory handles nuts, but it’s made on a separate line to nut products, is that enough? Or can it be made on the same line, but still be “nut free” if the manufacturer’s allergen controls are stringent enough?

Sometimes it feels a bit like the more you learn, the less you know…

Intentional ingredients and “may contains”

In the UK, if a prepacked food or alcoholic drink contains one of the top 14 food allergens (or an ingredient made from them), this must be declared on the label. From December 2014, the duty to provide allergen information will be extended to foods sold loose (for example, in a bakery or over a deli counter) and when eating out. However, the allergen labelling requirements, both now and from December, only cover those ingredients which have been intentionally added to the food’s recipe. They do not cover accidental cross-contamination, where an allergen has got into the food accidentally during the manufacturing process. (For more information, see Deciphering UK food allergen labelling law).

Food manufacturers are therefore not obliged to give “may contain” warnings, to alert consumers to a potential cross contamination risk. “May contain” labels are voluntary. You cannot look at a packet and guess the manufacturer’s motivation for adding the line “may contain nuts”. They may be acting responsibly and trying to inform consumers of a genuine cross contamination risk. Or they may simply be trying to cover themselves if a consumer has an allergic reaction, irrespective of the size of the risk.

Even where you are dealing with a responsible manufacturer, the “may contain” label doesn’t convey how much of an allergen may have got into a product. Even “may contain nut traces” does not indicate there are only “trace” amounts (whatever trace means).

Similarly, if the label is silent as regards “may contains”, you cannot assume the food is therefore safe. Yes, the manufacturer MIGHT have employed exemplary allergen control measures and, after a thorough assessment, has determined that there is minimal cross contamination risk and therefore a nut warning is not necessary. On the other hand, the manufacturer might be well aware that its allergen controls are slap dash, but has decided against the use of a warning label. In each case, the level of risk is anyone’s guess.

Our family’s approach is therefore to avoid anything labelled “may contain nuts” (or equivalent wording) and to contact the manufacturer for more information where the label is silent.

When SHOULD a food manufacturer use a “may contain nuts” warning?

In 2006, the Food Standards Agency published Guidance on Allergen Management and Consumer Information. The guidance is voluntary but sets out, for food companies, what the FSA views as best practice as regards cross contamination controls and “may contain” labelling. It’s worth a read.

The guidance states (at page 5) that:

“Advisory labelling should only be used when, following a thorough risk assessment, there is a demonstrable and significant risk of allergen cross-contamination.”

What’s so special about nuts?

One thing the Tesco “may contain nuts” labelling fiasco illustrates is that, in a food manufacturer’s eyes, there seems to be something special about nuts. As health journalist Alex Gazzola commented “Why is it always nuts – and never (it seems) fish nor sesame?”. I agree: after all, Tesco labelling didn’t used to state “Recipe: No eggs. Ingredients: Cannot guarantee egg free. Factory: No eggs”.

I expect the “thing about nuts” is a combination of the total number of people diagnosed with a peanut and/or tree nut allergy, combined with the propensity of peanuts and tree nuts to cause anaphylaxis, plus the fact that peanut (according to the FSA) is “the most common cause of fatal food allergy”.

In addition to this, it seems that nut dust is one of the trickier things to control, with the FSA guidance stating that:

“Cross-contamination by small pieces of allergenic foods such as peanuts, tree nuts and sesame seeds can be exceptionally difficult to manage and therefore may warrant additional consideration for use of advisory labelling.”

If there are nuts elsewhere in the factory, does that automatically mean a product isn’t nut safe?

Not necessarily. Whilst, in an ideal world there would be dedicated production facilities for allergenic products, the FSA guidance (at page 18) notes that it is possible to separate products by:

  • Keeping them in different parts of the production area.
  • Using physical barriers between the production lines.
  • Using dedicated equipment.
  • Minimising unnecessary movement of materials.
  • Having appropriate scheduling of production runs, including cleaning the equipment between runs.
  • Managing re-work, ensuring that residual material containing an allergen is not re-worked into a product not containing the allergen.
  • Separating the air supply, where practical.

So it follows that manufacturers can make a nut safe product, even if there are nuts in the factory, if they implement sufficiently robust allergen controls.

How does a manufacturer assess a “demonstrable and significant risk” of nut cross contamination?

A thorough risk assessment requires an evaluation of the “likelihood of allergen cross-contamination across the supply chain”, namely from raw materials right through to the finished product. The guidance includes a flowchart (at page 11) which helps food companies decide if a “may contain nuts” label is required. Broadly:

  • The company must decide whether there is a probable (likely) or remote (unlikely, but still possible) risk of cross contamination from nuts.
  • In assessing whether the risk is probable or remote, the question of whether products are made on shared equipment is key. If “a food is manufactured on a production line or equipment that comes into direct contact with allergen containing materials”, the guidance appears to suggest (at page 24) that this automatically puts the cross contamination risk in the “probable” risk bracket.
  • If the risk is “remote”, a nut warning label is not appropriate. However, if the risk is “probable”, then from that starting point, you go on to look at whether the risk can be managed.
  • The company needs to consider the physical form and the characteristics of the nut-containing material. For example, nut oils are likely to pose a lower risk than whole nuts (or pieces of nut). It can be difficult to remove nut powder or particulates from machinery. 

The guidance states (at page 26) that there IS a risk of cross contamination UNLESS:

  • There is clear demonstrable evidence of a ‘visually and physically clean’ or equivalent standard, or
  • Assessment of the end product as consumed indicates little or no allergenic protein remains.

So, my reading of all this is that:

  • shared lines or equipment
  • the fact you’re dealing with peanuts and tree nuts

both point to the need for a “may contain” label. However, IF tests show there are in fact no nut traces in the final product, a may contain label ISN’T necessary.

A positive “nut free” claim

Last November, I read an article in the Economic Voice that concerned me. A survey had found that:

“3 out of 4 allergic consumers would purchase products claiming to be ‘allergen free’ on the label – despite these claims being largely unregulated.”

Whilst the FSA guidance states that where a manufacturer makes a positive “Free From” or “made in a nut free factory” claim, this should be “based on specific, rigorous controls to ensure their validity”, the point we come back to is that the guidance itself is voluntary.

I confess: I would assume something that declares itself to be “nut free” (1) didn’t have nuts in the ingredients and (2) the manufacturer at best had “specific, rigorous controls” in place, or had at least assessed the chance of cross contamination as “remote” (and therefore not needing a may contain warning).

I do understand that:

  • It is impossible to absolutely 100% guarantee that a food is nut free, even dedicated nut safe brands such as Kinnerton and Just Love Food Company acknowledge this.
  • If there was the tiniest speck of allergen in a food, there is the question of whether current allergen testing methods could pick this up.

But surely putting a “nut free” label on a packet, when there were either (1) nuts in the ingredients or (2) the cross contamination risk was “demonstrable and significant”, would be labelling food “in a way which is likely to mislead as to its nature, substance or quality” (which would therefore breach section 15 of the Food Safety Act 1990)?

I don’t know the answer to this and it seems like yet another grey area in food allergen labelling.

Surely a consumer shouldn’t be required to think this hard about what a food label means? We need to know what’s in our food and be able to make a risk assessment from the food label alone. Shouldn’t a food do exactly what it says on the tin?

The Nutmums “nut free food” directory

So, in summary, when compiling the nut free food directory, I have included those brands who:

  • State on their product labels they are “nut free”. (Please do double check with the manufacturer if you disagree with my approach on this); or
  • Have products which don’t list nuts as an ingredient and don’t state “may contain nuts” (or equivalent wording) and who have given some assurance on their website (or by email to me) that their products are nut safe.

As ever, manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products but if you have any product recommendations, do let me know!

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Are you searching for safe foods for your nut allergic child? Whether you are hunting for nut free baby food, biscuits or birthday cake … looking for safe ingredients to cook from scratch or for ready meal brands you can trust … find suggestions here, in the Nutmums.com nut free food directory!

Below is an A-Z list of food manufacturers, which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

If you prefer to browse by the type of food, please see the following pages:

The A-Z of nut free food

A

Alpro

(yoghurts, soya milk)

Note: For more information on Alpro soya’s nut free status, see Alpro’s well that ends well.

Amy’s Kitchen

(does not use peanuts) (meals)

Nut allergy information Amys Kitchen

Anniversary House Sugarcraft

(cake toppers)

Note: Creative Party confirmed by email in August 2014 that “Our cake toppers do not contain nuts, however some of the colours used are produced in a factory where nuts are present”. If I can find out more details, I will update this entry.

B

Bannisters’ Farm

(jacket potatoes)

Screen Shot Bannisters 16.3.14

Barfoots

(sweetcorn bites)

Note: Barfoots confirmed by email in March 2014 that “Sweetcorn Bites are made in facility that is free from nuts.  We have a strict Nut Free site policy that doesn’t allow any nuts on site, including in the staff canteen”. Barfoots also advised that the sweetcorn is grown on farms with nut free policies and the growers and factories are regularly audited to check compliance with the policies.

Barkat

(bread, cereals, crackers, ice cream cones, pasta shapes)

The website listing for the alphabet shapes pasta (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Barkat

[see below – Cassandra’s comment regarding ice cream cones]

Beenies

(sweets)

Nut allergy information Beenies

Beyond Dark

(chocolate)

Note: Beyond Dark advised me in March 2014  that their product and manufacturing  are totally nut free.

BFree

(bread, rolls, bagels, wraps)

Nut allergy information BFree

Big Oz 

(cereals)

Nut allergy information Big Oz

 

Briannas

(salad dressing)

The website listing for the saucy ginger mandarin dressing (for example) states:

Screen Shot Briannas 18.3.14

C

Cadburys

(certain chocolate bars, buttons and drinks are listed as “nut absent”).

Note: As at 16 March 2014, the nut absent selection included Creme Egg, Twirl, Crunchie, Flake, Buttons and more…

Calypso

(soft drinks, ice lollies)

Nut allergy information Calypso

Carr’s

(savoury biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Celtic Chocolates

(chocolates)

Note: A copy of Celtic Chocolates nut statement is available on request by emailing the company. Whilst they don’t state their products are “nut free”, as at 14 March 2014 their policy said “… We do not use nuts in the factory and none of our ingredients contain nuts. We prohibit staff from consuming nuts in the canteen or bringing nuts on site and conduct spot checks to ensure this rule is adhered to …”

The Chocolate Alchemist

(chocolate coins, stocked by John Lewis)

Clive’s Pies

(pies)

Note: Clive’s Pies told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that whilst the factory in which the pies are made does handle nuts, the nut products are made on a different product line and a different day to the pies.

Coconut Dream

(milk alternative drinks)

Nut allergy information Coconut Dream

Cooks’ Ingredients

Note: Waitrose produce a list of Waitrose Own Label Products Suitable for those Avoiding Nuts and Peanuts, which is regularly updated. 

Cook’s Ketjap Manis

(soy sauce)

Note: Wingyip advised by email in March 2014 that the manufacturer “had confirmed that there are no traces of nuts in the product”.

Coyo

(coconut milk yoghurt)

The website listing for the natural yoghurt (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Coyo

Crawford’s

(biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Crespo

(olives)

Nut allergy information Crespo

D

D&D Chocolates

(chocolates)

Nut allergy information D&D

De Cecco

(pasta)

Note: De Cecco confirmed by email in March 2014 that “the pasta is produced in a nut free environment”.

Delamere Dairy

(soya drink)

Discovery Foods

(Mexican food)

Note: Discovery Foods produce an allergen report, listing “contains” and “may contain” information for each product.

Dolmio

(pasta sauces)

Note: Dolmio advised me in August 2013, that:

“If there’s a possibility of cross contamination then the product will have a suitable warning on the packaging… In effect, any products which don’t show nuts in the ingredients list or carry an appropriate warning can be taken as not containing nuts.”

Doves Farm

(pasta, cookies, baking ingredients)

The website listing for Lemon Zest Cookies (for example) states: “These award-winning cookies are baked in our dedicated gluten free bakery in Wiltshire that does not use gluten, milk, peanut, egg or soya.”

Their website FAQs give more detail, see for example Q: What allergens do you have onsite, and where?

DS Gluten Free

(bread, biscuits and pasta)

Note: DS Gluten Free told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that if a DS Gluten Free product doesn’t have a “may contain nuts” warning, it has been made in a nut free environment.

Duerr’s

(mincemeat)

Note: Duerr’s confirmed by email in December 2013 that their mincemeat:

“does not require a nut warning as there is no possibility of cross contamination; the production site is a nut free site”

E

Ella’s Kitchen

(baby and toddler foods)

Nut allergy information Ella's Kitchen

Eskal Nut Free Butter

(nut free butter)

Nut allergy information Eskal

F

The Frank Food Company Limited

(FRANK snack bars)

Screen Shot FRANK 17.3.14

Frebaco

(muesli and porridge)

Available from Tesco:

Frebaco fruit muesli

 

Free & Easy

(soups, sauces, ready meals, curry pastes and more)

Nut allergy information Free and Easy

Free From Italy

(pasta sauces)

Le Conserve della Nonna Pasta Sauce range includes tomato & basil, tomato & chilli and green pesto (this is made with pine nuts – for more information on pine nut allergy see the Anaphylaxis Campaign’s advice).

Nut allergy information Free From Italy

Friendly Food and Drink Company

(chutneys, jams, sauces and more)

Nut allergy information Friendly Food and Drink

G

Gefen

(sauces)

Goody Good Stuff

(sweets)

Nut allergy information Goody Good Stuff

Gourmet Garden

(herbs and spices)

Nut allergy information Gourmet Garden

Green Giant

(sweetcorn)

Note: Green Giant’s confirmed by email in August 2013 that:

“As part of our precautions every product, which we produce, is subject to a thorough safety evaluation by trained personnel. During the evaluation any possible allergens that are present from the raw ingredients through to the finished product will be identified, documented and if present labelled on the product packaging.”

Grenada Chocolate Company

(chocolate)

Nut allergy information Grenada Chocolate

H

Haribo 

(sweets)

Note: Haribo UK confirmed by email in August 2013 that “we do not use any nuts on site with the exception of coconut”. You can contact them for a full list of their sweets (produced in the UK) that are “suitable for nut free diets”.

Heavenly Cake Company

(cakes)

Nut allergy information Heavenly Cake Company

Heinz

(various)

Note: Heinz provide two lists, one of foods “suitable for a nut free diet” and one of foods “suitable for a peanut free diet. Request your copy here. The listed products do not contain any nut or peanut containing ingredients. The lists detail certain products from brands such as Amoy, Aunt Bessies, Baked Beans, Ross, Weight Watchers, plus various products such as sauces (for example Daddies, HP, Lea & Perrins) pasta and soups.

Helen Browning’s Organic

(hot dogs and speedy sausages)

Nut allergy information Helen Browning Sausages

Hipp Organic

(baby and toddler foods)

Note: The product section of the Hipp website allows you to filter products by “Peanut free” and “Other nut free”.

Holy Cow!

(curry sauces)

The website listing for Delhi Tikka Masala (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Holy Cow

Hovis

(bread)

Nut allergy information Hovis

I

Ilumi

(meals)

Nut allergy information Ilumi

Inka 

(corn snacks)

The website listing for Roasted Giant Corn (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Inka Snacks

Innocent

(smoothies and juices)

Nut allergy information Innocent

Isabel’s

(baking products)

Nut allergy information Isabels

It’s Nut Free

(cake bars, cereals, chocolates, snack bags)

Nut allergy information It's Nut Free

J

Jacob’s

(biscuits, crackers)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Just Love Food Company

(cakes)

Nut allergy information Just Love Food Company

K

Kellogg’s 

(some of their breakfast cereals)

Kelly’s of Cornwall

(ice cream)

Note: Kelly’s of Cornwall ice cream to be made in a factory which handles nuts from late 2015 (see announcement from Kelly’s).

Note: Kelly’s confirmed by email in August 2013 that:

“All of our ice cream in tubs (1Ltr / 2Ltr etc) is made in a nut free factory so it will be suitable for people with nut allergies. “

Kettle Chips

(crisps)

Nut allergy information Kettle Chips

Kingsmill

(bread, muffins, crumpets etc)

Note: Kingsmill confirmed by email in March 2014 that “our bread does not contain any nuts”.

Kinnerton

(chocolates, including Easter Eggs)

Nut allergy information Kinnerton

Kirsty’s

(meals)

Nut allergy information Kirstys

Koko

(milk alternative made with coconut milk)

Kooky Dough

(ready to bake cookie dough)

Note: Although Kooky Dough used to make a “Crunchy Choc ‘n’ Nut” dough, they confirmed by email in March 2014 that they no longer produce any products with nuts and have moved to a peanut free factory. “Nuts are not allowed on site and we adhere to very strict regulations to ensure this.”

L

Little Pasta Organics

(pasta sauce for kids)

The website listing for Spinach + Broccoli (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Little Pasta Organics

Lyle’s Golden Syrup

(syrups)

Nut allergy information Lyle's

M

Marigold

(stock, yeast flakes)

The website listing for Engevita yeast flakes (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Marigold

Matthew Walker

(Christmas pudding)

Nut allergy information Matthew Walker

McVitie’s

(biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. The July 2015 list includes milk chocolate digestives, ginger nuts, jaffa cakes, rich tea and more…

Minara

(curry sauces)

Nut allergy information Minara

Mortimer Chocolate Company

(chocolate powder for drinks and baking, melt and dip chocolates)

Nut allergy information Mortimer

N

Nestle

(hot drinks, confectionery, yoghurts, cereals and more)

Newburn Bakehouse 

(bread, rolls, tea cakes etc)

Note: Newburn Bakehouse told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that “Newburn Bakehouse”  is the Warburtons’ gluten free range, which is all nut free and made in a nut free environment.

New Forest Ice Cream

(ice cream, sorbets)

Nut allergy information New Forest Ice Cream

Nut Free Chocolate People

(chocolates)

Nut allergy information Nut Free Chocolate People

O

Oat Dream

(milk alternative drinks)

Nut allergy information Oat Dream

Organix

(some of their baby and toddler foods)

Note: Organix produce an allergen data sheet, detailing whether nuts are “in recipe” and “in factory” for each product.

Oreo

(biscuits)

Nut allergy information Oreo

Orgran

(cakes, pasta, bread and snacks)

Nut allergy information Orgran

P

Penn State

(pretzels)

Note: The label states “These snacks were produced in a nut free factory”.

Pennywise

(savoury biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Peter Rabbit Organics

(baby and toddler foods)

Nut allergy information Peter Rabbit

Plamil

(egg free mayonnaise, chocolate, carob, milk alternative)

Nut allergy information Plamil

Pom-Bear

(children’s teddy shaped crisps)

Prewetts

(porridge, chicory)

Note: Prewetts told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that although they make, for example, nut-containing cereals, they also have products (such as their porridge and chicory) which are nut free and made in a nut free environment.

Punjaban Curry Bases

(curry sauces)

Nut allergy information Punjaban

Purbeck Ice Cream

(ice cream, sorbets)

Nut allergy information Purbeck Ice Cream

R

Rizopia

(rice pasta)

Nut allergy information Rizopia

Robertson’s

(mincemeat)

Note: Robertson’s confirmed by email in December 2013  that “our mincemeat is nut free, and our factory is a controlled site, with no nuts being permitted on site.”

Robinsons

(fruit shoots, fruit squash)

Note: Robinson’s confirmed by email in August 2013 that “Robinson’s Fruit Squashes and Fruit Shoots do not contain traces of nuts.”

S

St Dalfour

(fruit spreads)

Note: St Dalfour confirmed by email in August 2013 that  “None of our Fruit Spread products contains nuts, or is made in a facility handling nuts.”

Superjam

(jam)

Sweet Mandarin

(sauces)

Nut allergy information Sweet Mandarin

T

Tasha’s Dairy Free Delights

(chocolates made from Plamil chocolate)

Nut allergy information Tasha

V

Vivesoy

(soy drinks)

Nut allergy information Vivesoy

W

Weetabix

(Weetabix, Oatibix, Ready Brek, Weetos)

Note: Weetabix produce a nut & peanut list detailing “contains” and “may contain” information for each product.

Wowbutter

(nut free butter)

Nut allergy information Wowbutter

Z

Zero Zebra

(chocolate)

Nut allergy information Zero Zebra

See also:

Supermarket product lists

Certain supermarkets have product guidance lists for nut allergy sufferers (please do check you are referring to the most up-to-date version):

Nut Free Baby Food View More

Are you looking for nut free purees? Safe toddler meals? Or maybe nut free rice cakes and baby crisps?

If so, check out the list below which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Baby and toddler foods

Ella’s Kitchen

(baby and toddler foods)

Nut allergy information Ella's Kitchen

Hipp Organic

(baby and toddler foods)

Note: The product section of the Hipp website allows you to filter products by “Peanut free” and “Other nut free”.

Little Pasta Organics

(pasta sauce for kids)

The website listing for Spinach + Broccoli (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Little Pasta Organics

Organix

(some of their baby and toddler foods)

Note: Organix produce an allergen data sheet, detailing whether nuts are “in recipe” and “in factory” for each product.

Peter Rabbit Organics

(baby and toddler foods)

Nut allergy information Peter Rabbit

Pom-Bear

(children’s teddy shaped crisps)

Nut allergy information Pom Bear

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.

 

View More

Are you looking for nut free biscuits? Searching for a safe birthday cake?

If so, check out the list below which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Biscuits (sweet and savoury)

Barkat

(bread, cereals, crackers, ice cream cones, pasta shapes)

The website listing for the alphabet shapes pasta (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Barkat

Carr’s

(savoury biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Crawford’s

(biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Doves Farm

(pasta, cookies, baking ingredients)

The website listing for Lemon Zest Cookies (for example) states: “These award-winning cookies are baked in our dedicated gluten free bakery in Wiltshire that does not use gluten, milk, peanut, egg or soya.”

Their website FAQs give more detail, see for example Q: What allergens do you have onsite, and where?

DS Gluten Free

(bread, biscuits and pasta)

Note: DS Gluten Free told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that if a DS Gluten Free product doesn’t have a “may contain nuts” warning, it has been made in a nut free environment.

Jacob’s

(biscuits, crackers)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

McVitie’s

(biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. The July 2015 list includes milk chocolate digestives, ginger nuts, jaffa cakes, rich tea and more…

Oreo

(biscuits)

Nut allergy information Oreo

Pennywise

(savoury biscuits)

Note: United Biscuits produce a list of Products suitable for a nut and peanut avoidance diet, which is regularly updated. 

Cakes

Anniversary House Sugarcraft

(cake toppers)

Note: Creative Party confirmed by email in August 2014 that “Our cake toppers do not contain nuts, however some of the colours used are produced in a factory where nuts are present”. If I can find out more details, I will update this entry.

The Frank Food Company Limited

(FRANK snack bars)

Screen Shot FRANK 17.3.14

Heavenly Cake Company

(cakes)

Nut allergy information Heavenly Cake Company

It’s Nut Free

(cake bars, cereals, chocolates, snack bags)

Nut allergy information It's Nut Free

Just Love Food Company

(cakes)

Nut allergy information Just Love Food Company

Matthew Walker

(Christmas pudding)

Nut allergy information Matthew Walker

Orgran

(cakes, pasta, bread and snacks)

Nut allergy information Orgran

Crisps and similar snacks

Inka 

(corn snacks)

The website listing for Roasted Giant Corn (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Inka Snacks

Kettle Chips

(crisps)

Nut allergy information Kettle Chips

Penn State

(pretzels)

Note: The label states “These snacks were produced in a nut free factory”.

Pom-Bear

(children’s teddy shaped crisps)

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.

View More

Are you looking for nut free bagels or tortilla wraps? Searching for safe granola? Want to know which pasta brands you can trust?

If so, check out the list below which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Bread

Barkat

(bread, cereals, crackers, ice cream cones, pasta shapes)

The website listing for the alphabet shapes pasta (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Barkat

BFree

(bread, rolls, bagels, wraps)

Nut allergy information BFree

Discovery Foods

(Mexican food)

Note: Discovery Foods produce an allergen report, listing “contains” and “may contain” information for each product.

DS Gluten Free

(bread, biscuits and pasta)

Note: DS Gluten Free told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that if a DS Gluten Free product doesn’t have a “may contain nuts” warning, it has been made in a nut free environment.

Hovis

(bread)

Nut allergy information Hovis

Kingsmill

(bread, muffins, crumpets etc)

Note: Kingsmill confirmed by email in March 2014 that “our bread does not contain any nuts”.

Newburn Bakehouse 

(bread, rolls, tea cakes etc)

Note: Newburn Bakehouse told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that “Newburn Bakehouse”  is the Warburtons’ gluten free range, which is all nut free and made in a nut free environment.

Orgran

(cakes, pasta, bread and snacks)

Nut allergy information Orgran

Breakfast cereals

Barkat

(bread, cereals, crackers, ice cream cones, pasta shapes)

The website listing for the alphabet shapes pasta (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Barkat

Big Oz 

(cereals)

Nut allergy information Big Oz

Frebaco

(muesli and porridge)

Available from Tesco:

Frebaco fruit muesli

It’s Nut Free

(cake bars, cereals, chocolates, snack bags)

Nut allergy information It's Nut Free

Kellogg’s 

(some of their breakfast cereals)

Nestle

(hot drinks, confectionery, yoghurts, cereals and more)

Prewetts

(porridge, chicory)

Note: Prewetts told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that although they make, for example, nut-containing cereals, they also have products (such as their porridge and chicory) which are nut free and made in a nut free environment.

Weetabix

(Weetabix, Oatibix, Ready Brek, Weetos)

Note: Weetabix produce a nut & peanut list detailing “contains” and “may contain” information for each product.

Pasta

Barkat

(bread, cereals, crackers, ice cream cones, pasta shapes)

The website listing for the alphabet shapes pasta (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Barkat

Cornito

(pasta and crackers)

Nut allergy information Cornito

De Cecco

(pasta)

Note: De Cecco confirmed by email in March 2014 that “the pasta is produced in a nut free environment”.

Doves Farm

(pasta, cookies, baking ingredients)

The website listing for Lemon Zest Cookies (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Doves Farm

DS Gluten Free

(bread, biscuits and pasta)

Note: DS Gluten Free told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that if a DS Gluten Free product doesn’t have a “may contain nuts” warning, it has been made in a nut free environment.

Orgran

(cakes, pasta, bread and snacks)

Nut allergy information Orgran

 

Rizopia

(rice pasta)

Nut allergy information Rizopia

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.

 

View More

Are you looking for a nut free peanut butter alternative? Or a safe brand of jam or chutney?

If so, check out the list below which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Nut free butters

Eskal Nut Free Butter

(nut free butter)

Nut allergy information Eskal

Wowbutter

(nut free butter)

Nut allergy information Wowbutter

Spreads and jams

Friendly Food and Drink Company

(chutneys, jams, sauces and more)

Nut allergy information Friendly Food and Drink

St Dalfour

(fruit spreads)

Note: St Dalfour confirmed by email in August 2013 that  “None of our Fruit Spread products contains nuts, or is made in a facility handling nuts.”

Superjam

(jam)

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.

 

View More

Are you looking for nut free chocolates? Or a trustworthy brand of sweets? Or stood in front of an ice cream van, do you need to know which ice lolly is safe?

If so, check out the list below which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Chocolate

Beyond Dark

(chocolate)

Note: Beyond Dark advised me in March 2014  that their product and manufacturing  are totally nut free.

Cadburys

(certain chocolate bars, buttons and drinks are listed as “nut absent”).

Note: As at 16 March 2014, the nut absent selection included Creme Egg, Twirl, Crunchie, Flake, Buttons and more…

Celtic Chocolates

(chocolates)

Note: A copy of Celtic Chocolates nut statement is available on request by emailing the company. Whilst they don’t state their products are “nut free”, as at 14 March 2014 their policy said “… We do not use nuts in the factory and none of our ingredients contain nuts. We prohibit staff from consuming nuts in the canteen or bringing nuts on site and conduct spot checks to ensure this rule is adhered to …”

The Chocolate Alchemist

(chocolate coins, stocked by John Lewis)

D&D Chocolates

(chocolates)

Nut allergy information D&D

Grenada Chocolate Company

(chocolate)

Nut allergy information Grenada Chocolate

It’s Nut Free

(cake bars, cereals, chocolates, snack bags)

Nut allergy information It's Nut Free

Kinnerton

(chocolates, including Easter Eggs)

Nut allergy information Kinnerton

Mortimer Chocolate Company

(chocolate powder for drinks and baking, melt and dip chocolates)

Nut allergy information Mortimer

Nestle

(hot drinks, confectionery, yoghurts, cereals and more)

Nut Free Chocolate People

(chocolates)

Nut allergy information Nut Free Chocolate People

Plamil

(egg free mayonnaise, chocolate, carob, milk alternative)

Nut allergy information Plamil

Tasha’s Dairy Free Delights

(chocolates made from Plamil chocolate)

Nut allergy information Tasha

Zero Zebra

(chocolate)

Nut allergy information Zero Zebra

Sweets

Beenies

(sweets)

Nut allergy information Beenies

Goody Good Stuff

(sweets)

Nut allergy information Goody Good Stuff

Haribo 

(sweets)

Note: Haribo UK confirmed by email in August 2013 that “we do not use any nuts on site with the exception of coconut”. You can contact them for a full list of their sweets (produced in the UK) that are “suitable for nut free diets”.

Ice cream

Kelly’s of Cornwall

(ice cream)

Note: Kelly’s of Cornwall ice cream to be made in a factory which handles nuts from late 2015 (see announcement from Kelly’s).

Note: Kelly’s confirmed by email in August 2013 that:

“All of our ice cream in tubs (1Ltr / 2Ltr etc) is made in a nut free factory so it will be suitable for people with nut allergies. “

New Forest Ice Cream

(ice cream, sorbets)

Nut allergy information New Forest Ice Cream

Purbeck Ice Cream

(ice cream, sorbets)

Nut allergy information Purbeck Ice Cream

 

Lollies

(soft drinks, ice lollies)

Nut allergy information Calypso

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.

View More

Think a nut allergy means you always have to cook food from scratch? Not so! Check out the list of meals and hot foods below, which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Meals and hot foods

Amy’s Kitchen

(does not use peanuts) (meals)

Nut allergy information Amys Kitchen

Bannisters’ Farm

(jacket potatoes)

Screen Shot Bannisters 16.3.14

Clive’s Pies

(pies)

Note: Clive’s Pies told me at the Allergy Show in October 2013 that whilst the factory in which the pies are made does handle nuts, the nut products are made on a different product line and a different day to the pies.

Free & Easy

(soups, sauces, ready meals, curry pastes and more)

Nut allergy information Free and Easy

Green Giant

(sweetcorn)

Note: Green Giant’s confirmed by email in August 2013 that:

“As part of our precautions every product, which we produce, is subject to a thorough safety evaluation by trained personnel. During the evaluation any possible allergens that are present from the raw ingredients through to the finished product will be identified, documented and if present labelled on the product packaging.”

Helen Browning’s Organic

(hot dogs and speedy sausages)

Nut allergy information Helen Browning Sausages

Ilumi

(meals)

Nut allergy information Ilumi

Kirsty’s

(meals)

Nut allergy information Kirstys

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.

View More

Are you looking for a nut free milk alternative? Whether you are avoiding dairy because of an allergy, intolerance, because you’re vegan, or for some other reason, check out the list below which includes both:

  • Dedicated “nut free” food brands; and
  • Details of other food manufacturers which, according to their product labels or information on their website, do produce some nut free products.

Manufacturers do change their recipes (and their production arrangements), so please do check the product label for yourself each time, and make your own enquiries of the manufacturer, if you are in any doubt about whether something is safe.

I will add to the list as I come across more nut free brands and products … and do let me know if you have any product recommendations!

Please see the main nut free food page, for a complete alphabetised list of all the nut free food brands listed on Nutmums.com.

Milk alternatives

Alpro

(yoghurts, soya milk)

Note: For more information on Alpro soya’s nut free status, see Alpro’s well that ends well.

Coconut Dream

(milk alternative drinks)

Nut allergy information Coconut Dream

Coyo

(coconut milk yoghurt)

The website listing for the natural yoghurt (for example) states:

Nut allergy information Coyo

Delamere Dairy

(soya drink)

Koko

(milk alternative made with coconut milk)

Plamil

(egg free mayonnaise, chocolate, carob, milk alternative)

Nut allergy information Plamil

Vivesoy

(soy drinks)

Nut allergy information Vivesoy

For other nut free food items…

Please see:

For an A-Z list of all brands featured on Nutmums.com, see here.